GREG'S LEGACY

Specialising in the human experience of Living with prostate cancer – warts and all

Cancer Detection Using A Dogs Sense Of Smell

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A dogs Tail

A dogs Tail

I recently read an interesting article that has prompted me to present the information here for my readers. At the latest annual meeting of the American Urological Association a presentation was given by a group of Italian researches on the results of a study in the use of dogs to identify prostate cancer. The link to this article appears among other links at the end of this post.

As a young man I spent three years in the Australian army, two years as a member of a unique unit establishing a mine dog section to support our troops in Vietnam. Mine warfare on jungle trails and bunker systems had become a whole new ball-game for our defence forces needing new methods to counter the devices being used. This unit was formed in 1971 and was due to be deployed to Vietnam in November 1972. The new Australian Government however announced the withdrawal of our troops in August 1972, so the unit never deployed to Vietnam. The mine dog section of 1972 however evolved over the years into the modern era, where our soldiers depend on the use of what are now known as explosive detection dogs. Our current forces with these dogs have served with distinction in Iraq and Afghanistan.

I can recall how amazed I was when time after time these dogs were able to locate explosive targets in all sorts of hidden positions, either buried or concealed in unbelievable locations. The size of the charges did not seem to effect the results, from large caches to microscopic residue found in a car boot. My admiration for a dog’s nose grew larger as we became involved with the early training of the custom drug dog training team. Two custom officers joined us for a period of time and together we successfully re-trained two of our mine dogs to locate drugs of all types. They of course went on to build the current drug detection units we see today.

So it was no surprise to me when I read the presentation and results on the study of dogs detecting prostate cancer at the AUA annual meeting. Further reading by me had me asking myself why this type of research has taken so long to be recognised and more widely promoted. I can only hope it will lead to a safer non evasive method of detecting cancer of all types for patients.

The following information may be of value in understanding what the results of the study could lead to in cancer detection. There are 220 million olfactory cells in a canine nose, compared with 50 million for humans. When dogs are trained to sniff for a target, they are detecting the chemicals emitted by the target. These chemicals are microscopic and are referred to as volatile organic compounds, or VOC’s. The particular VOC’s emitted by explosives and drugs have been identified and hence electronic sniffers for these compounds are now in use as can be witnessed at airports.

It is the same for the detection of cancer. Specific microscopic VOC’s have been found in the breath of lung cancer patients and colon cancer patients, as well as in the urine of prostate cancer patients. The most recent findings have spurred increased interest in dog cancer detection research, including efforts to determine the identity of the VOC’s emitted by different types of cancer. This would assist in the development of electronic devices that can mimic the accuracy of a dog’s sense of smell in detecting cancer in humans.

Now to the study results referred to at the beginning of my article. Two German Shepherds called Liu and Zoey (Ex Explosive Detection Dogs) were able to detect the presence of prostate cancer with an accuracy of 98.1 percent among more than 800 samples tested. These included samples from men with very low-risk disease, men with metastatic disease, healthy males, healthy females, and patients with non-neoplastic diseases or non-prostatic tumors. The dogs were able to detect low-risk and more advanced prostate cancers with equal facility.

In other areas Dina Zaphiris, a recognized dog trainer in America who works with canines on federally funded studies in detecting early cancer in humans. In 2009, Zaphiris, a dog trainer for 25 years founded the In Situ Foundation, a nonprofit organization that trains cancer detection dogs and conducts research in the field. In her studies, patients exhale through a tube on to a cloth, which captures molecules, or VOCs, of a malignancy. Trained dogs then sniff the cloths for cancer presence.

A Cause Worth Supporting

A Cause Worth Supporting

This information seems to back up the cliché that a dog is truly a mans best friend. The possibilities opening up with this work may be life changing in the early detection of cancer.

Lee aka Popeye.

Further Reading

http://prostatecancerinfolink.net/2014/05/21/liu-and-zoey-are-ferraris-who-massively-outperform-psa-testing/#more-19712

http://www.dogsdetectcancer.org/

 

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/sns-wp-blm-news-bc-cancer-dogs24-20140524,0,4294267.story

 

 

 

Written by Lee

24 June 2014 at 11:42 pm

Blood in the Urine and Radiation Cystitis Part Two

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Emergency

Emergency

I thought I had closed off the subject on haemorrhagic bladder cystitis and blood in the urine but recent events have led me to write this article. What I am about to describe is not a “Poor Me” event but an article I feel needs to be explored to inform those patients who may have to face the same situation as I am going through. This is a personal description of what it is like to have a massive bladder bleed with retention and bladder spasm’s.

As I have written in my past few posts I am undergoing hyperbaric oxygen treatment in an effort to heal my diagnosed bladder cystitis. However a few days ago I experienced a massive bleeding event resulting in a midnight dash to the Townsville Hospital Emergency Department.

I will start by trying to describe what it is like to experience a bladder spasm. If you have ever experienced a severe muscle cramp or witnessed a footballer suddenly collapsing in agony with a muscle cramp spasm you will have some idea of what this may be like. The difference however is the frequent amounts of spasm’s experienced by urine retention patients. Throughout my whole ordeal I was experiencing these attacks on a regular basis for two days and nights with the bowels joining in the chorus at times. Sleep was non-existent all through this period and on a pain level out of 10 it was a 15 every time. I felt like I was being disemboweled

My adventure began as a series of small bleeds during the evening suddenly increasing to urinary retention where I was unable to pass the clots. At the point at which I could not pass any urine or clots the bladder spasm’s began to wrack my lower pubic area and off to the emergency department I went. The emergency department were terrific and admitted me straight up and administered some pain killers and inserted a three-way foley catheter. (Having one of these catheter’s inserted and retrieved deserves an article in itself, however I will leave this for another time)

The next couple of days and nights have been seared into my memory as the worst distressing period of my life. They gave me some heavy pain-killer medication plus a drug (oxybutynin) to help minimise the spasm’s. These helped somewhat take the edge of the pain except during the height of a spasm which would last approx 30 seconds and then reliably return approx every 30 minutes. I found I could not lie down for long but was better able to handle the spasm’s when I was standing erect, so, standing I was for two days and nights. The catheter kept blocking with clots and the nurse had to constantly flush the catheter. sometimes I could clear it myself by jiggling, squeezing or adopting different stances to keep the flow going.

The bleeding finally stopped and I was released back out into the wild and back to my hyperbaric treatment. I am still left with the occasional mild spasm, a little incontinence and increased painful urination. The hyperbaric unit has been supportive and wish me to continue with treatment. They do not see this as a failure in my treatment as I am only half way through my sessions. They explained that the treatment is aimed at supplying oxygen to these blood vessels thus assisting in the healing. This healing effect will continue for a couple of months after completing my sessions. It could be possible I may relapse in the future but I can always have the treatment again at some point if needed.

Catheter Fun

Catheter Fun

Summarising these events I would like to say that those days and nights were the most painful, distressing, unhygienic, un-dignified and embarrassing moments in my life. In describing these events I have painted a bleak picture with little or no hints for those who may yet travel this path. Greg wanted this site to be warts and all and that is the reason I have submitted this article. It’s main aim is to at least warn those patients that this road may yet confront them in their cancer treatment travels and also to highlight that they are not alone, someone has been there before. Drink at least two litres of plain water daily and mind the foods you eat. They should be non acid forming and not spicy. Tea, coffee and alcohol should be modified or discontinued. The aim of the game is to reduce bladder irritants and flush the system with water.

I would like to publically thank the staff of the emergency department at Townsville General Hospital for holding my hand throughout this ordeal.

Lee aka Popeye

 

Written by Lee

5 June 2014 at 4:32 pm

Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment. “A Personal View”

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The Chamber of Youth

The Chamber of Youth

At long last I can finally put pen to paper and give readers an update on what has been happening with myself and my treatment. You may recall in a previous post that I revealed I was having some problems with radiation induced bladder cystitis and I would need to be treated in a hyperbaric chamber. Prior to the treatment I was instructed to have a colonoscopy just to check if there was any evidence of radiation proctitus affecting the bowel. Well guess what?…….. I have been diagnosed with both.

I previously explained that this type of radiation damage is rare these days, due to improvements in modern methods of directing radiation beams to tissue and organs. Approx 7 / 10% of patients will experience radiation damage to healthy tissue either in the short-term, (acute) or long-term (chronic). This damage to tissue can occur years after receiving radiation treatment and is difficult to heal.

Basically, radiation bladder cystitis and radiation proctitis is damage to the blood vessels surrounding the wall of the bladder and colon. The blood vessels rupture and bleed causing a degradation of quality of life and/or life threatening conditions as it progresses. These conditions do not respond well to drug treatment and show a limited response when the blood vessels are cauterised. Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment is the gold standard for this condition with a cure rate of approx 80%.

I will not go into any further descriptions or prognosis on these two conditions, nor the technical science behind Hyperbaric Medicine. I have already written fairly extensively on the medical conditions in previous articles and I have included at the end of this post, links to articles of interest regarding Hyperbaric Medicine. What I will try to do, is give a personal account of my treatment so far in the chamber.

I arrived at the Townsville Hospital over a week ago and located the Hyperbaric Medicine unit in a back corridor where I met all the staff who are a tight-knit medical and technical unit operating the chamber for patients with all sorts of medical conditions, from radiation damage, to wounds not responding to normal medical treatment. Nearly all of these staff are recreational divers and are dedicated people.

Treatments vary from twenty to fifty daily treatments including weekends. There are two separate sessions a day, lasting for two hours each. I am to receive fifty treatments and have been allocated to the afternoon sessions. The chamber here in Townsville is rectangular and can hold 8 patients a session plus a nurse. On arrival, patients are required to change into “Party Clothes,” anti static coloured garments that are one size fits all, plus cute little colourful booties, nothing is taken into the chamber apart from a book or magazine. There is a television available that usually plays a movie if requested but the choices have to be, a movie that is no longer than two hours and has sub-titles because you cannot hear any audio due to the oxygen demand set up.

The session begins by pressurising the chamber to 140kps or approx equivalent to 14 meters,or in other words two and a bit atmospheres. This takes about 20 minutes to descend and you constantly need to keep equalising pressure in your ears, some drink water, others yawn and wiggle jaws and some hold noses and blow. When you get to pressure, a clear hood is placed over your head and you begin to breathe pure oxygen. I couldn’t help but be amused and smiled to myself as I did, that it reminded me of a Dr Who program complete with the Daleks “exterminate, exterminate.” There are two air breaks during the session, where the hoods are removed for five minutes and then the session ends as the pressure is gradually decreased taking approx 20 minutes to ascend with the hoods and oxygen in place.

This treatment is not invasive, nor does it create any side effects. I have read and heard some astounding things about the benefits of this treatment and as I look about at the staff and the long-term patients, I wonder about the glow of good healthy, youthful skin they all seem to possess……Could this be the fountain of youth????? The high pressure experienced forcing the pure oxygen into the bodies cells, reviving blood vessels and assisting with rebuilding neucrotic tissue and expelling waste……Mmmmmm …..Nice thought.

Is this a cure-all

Is this a cure-all

Time will be the judge for my condition but touch wood, I have not had a bleed since I began treatment, still I am looking forward to my fiftieth dive and going home at last.

Lee aka Popeye

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperbaric_medicine

http://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/diet-and-fitness/how-effective-is-oxygen-treatment-20130524-2k52c.html

http://www.hyperbarichealth.com/doc/hyperbarichealth-booklet.pdf

http://www.cancer.org/treatment/treatmentsandsideeffects/complementaryandalternativemedicine/herbsvitaminsandminerals/hyperbaric-oxygen-therapy

 

Written by Lee

15 May 2014 at 3:44 pm

The Search For New Pathways In Devolping New Cancer Drugs

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New Drug Pathways

New Drug Pathways

I apologise to my readers for the long delay in setting down any new material on this website. There are quite a few reasons for this delay but it is largely a result of writers seizure….. I simply have not been inspired to sit down and create an article that may be of interest to readers. New inspiration has been hard to come by, as lately I seem to be overly concentrating on my personal trials and tribulations without considering the wider view of prostate cancer and its effects on patients and carers.

Recently I was sent the following interesting piece of information by a fellow sufferer and member of one of the prostate support groups that I belong to. Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death in Australian men after lung cancer. Current drugs used for treatment of prostate cancer don’t specifically target the cancer cell, hence the long list of side effects.

In the link provided below an Australian PhD researcher Alice Klein describes her work designing new prostate cancer drugs which only kill the cancer and leave other cells unaffected. This link will take you to an ABC radio broadcast on the “Science Show” plus an accessible printed transcript of Alice Klein’s speech.

I am not sure how long this link will remain active but I can guarantee that this talk on her research will be of interest to all cancer sufferers as researchers continue to seek new pathways in the fight against cancer. God speed Alice.

http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/scienceshow/new-approach-in-drug-design-for-treating-prostate-cancer/5384886

As for an update on myself…….. I will be heading off to Townsville very soon to undergo hyperbaric oxygen treatment for the radiation bladder cystitis. I am scheduled for a colonoscopy next monday to investigate if there is any additional radiation damage to the bowel area and the results of this procedure will affect the length of the treatment I will receive in Townsville.

I look forward to reporting on the hyperbaric treatment and the results, as I feel confident that my report my help others who are facing the same sort of side effects from radiation therapy and give them confidence in having these issues successfully dealt with.

The Search Continues

The Search Continues

Lee aka Popeye

Written by Lee

23 April 2014 at 11:22 pm

Posted in PERSONAL

Radiation Cystitus and Blood in the Urine

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Something to surprise and something to live with

Something to surprise and something to live with

Ok everyone here we go…..This article has been inspired by events that are evolving as I write this. I have had some symptoms lately that have been disturbing to me and my search for answers has been a little enlightening to say the least. I have been waiting for some sort of resolution so I could present my findings here to help others who may come along with a similar path to mine.

The treatments for prostate cancer and every mans journey is slightly different (How true is that statement.) After diagnosis and depending on the treatments one chooses, brings into play a multitude of possible side effects that impact on the quality of life of a patient. What I offer here is an insight into a possible side effect that I believe is not fully appreciated by those undertaking radiation treatment for prostate cancer. When I began to experience these side effects of radiation therapy I was astounded as to the repercussions that were possible in the events I am about to relate. I was also surprised at the amount of relevant information available on this issue when a person actually goes looking for these answers and information. So here for everyone’s interest is a run down on the possibility of contracting radiation bladder cystitis.

I have now been diagnosed with this complication after ongoing recurrent urinary infections and the development over the past six months of episodes of gross hematuria. At the very beginning I thought I was aware of the side effects and complications but I certainly was not fully aware of the complete implications that these may have on a patient. I have since correlated a fair amount of information on this subject and would like to share this here for future reference for any other unfortunate radiation patients faced with the same prognosis.

Radiation Cystitis is a rare complication of the bladder caused by treatment of radiation therapy to the pelvic region. Reports indicate it may occur in approx. 7% to 10% of prostate cancer patient’s undergoing this procedure (Guess who drew the short straw). The side effects of treatment can be immediate and acute or perhaps develop months or years after completion of treatment. In some cases radiation side effects can be resolved fairly easily but in other cases they may be more difficult to treat and this can have lasting effects on a patients quality of life and there is a possibility of mortality from urinary blockages causing kidney problems and a life threatening infection called urosepsis.

Modern radiotherapy techniques have improved the focus of the beams and can be modulated so that less radiation is delivered to the more sensitive areas around the prostate. This reduces the likelihood of long-term tissue damage but problems can still occur. Radiotherapy can damage the soft tissue and blood vessels lining the bowel or bladder and this reduces the blood supply to these areas so that when treatment is completed, these blood vessels and soft tissue do not have enough blood supply to support efficient healing causing necrosis.

In my case I developed recurring pelvic and urinary infections since my TURP procedure in 2012. I completed IMRT radiation treatment in December 2012 and my PSA remains at 0.02 as of today so things appear OK on the prostate cancer side. However for the past six months I have experienced some bleeding along with clots in my urine from time to time which culminated in February this year with a massive bleed. The event was very painful and distressing, as for several hours I continued to bleed and pass clots, some of which blocked my urethra until the pressure became strong enough to pass them through.

Last week after many previous delays I finally had a procedure called a cystoscopy, which diagnosed radiation induced bladder wall bleeding with multiple telangiectasia ( spider vein type blood vessels) noted on bladder wall. The urologist has now referred me to a radiation oncologist. .From my understanding the only real successful treatment available for this condition is treatment in a hyperbaric oxygen chamber

I have now outlined this subject from a first hand point of view and it now only needs me to follow this up after my next consultation with the radiation oncologist and any subsequent treatment. My lovely wife and carer has reminded me of the following and it is worth repeating here as I finish up this article.

Amen

Amen

After my prostate cancer diagnosis and regarding the decision-making process we had to make. We made our decision at that time based on advice from specialists and our own rushed but thorough learning curve of radiation coupled with ADT. We were aware of the radiation consequences just as we were aware of the surgical and ADT consequences but realistically way back then, we believe there was no other alternative. Today having come this far down the track and experiencing most of the side effects we read about then and now, we are now faced with this issue needing to be dealt with: BUT WE AGREE THAT WE WOULD STILL MAKE THE SAME TREATMENT DECISION TODAY.

I look forward to bringing an update to this forum on my ongoing treatment for this condition as it occurs.

Cheers

Lee aka Popeye

Further readings

.http://theprostatedecision.wordpress.com/2012/06/07/but-i-had-radiation-for-my-prostate-cancer-over-5-years-ago-blood-and-clots-in-the-urine-after-radiation-for-prostate-cancer/

http://www.cancer.org/cancer/prostatecancer/detailedguide/prostate-cancer-treating-radiation-therapy

http://prostate-cancer.org/PDFs/Is14-3_p22.pdf

https://www.chswoundcare.com/sites/default/files/articles/Radiation%20Hemorrhagic%20Cystitis%20and%20HBOT.pdf

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemorrhagic_cystitis

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2938536/

http://www.urology-textbook.com/radiation-cystitis.html

Written by Lee

12 March 2014 at 12:10 am

A Cancer Patient Caregiver Perspective

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You Are The The Wind Beneath My Wings

You Are The The Wind Beneath My Wings

In my course of seeking information on all aspects of prostate cancer and cancer in general, I have a list of favourite sites I visit daily to keep me up to date with the latest issues. I have just come away from one of these sites nearly in tears with one of the articles offered regarding a brief compendium from a spouse of a man. This article is one of the most powerful and revealing insights into what it means to be a loving partner and care giver to a spouse who has been diagnosed with this horrible disease.

I do not care if I am infringing on any copy write prohibitions by posting this article here on this site, as I think this information deserves a wider appreciation by readers. I apologise in advance if anyone may be offended, but I believe this is an important disclosure that uplifts the spirit on what it means to love someone and confirms the vows of:  “In sickness and health, for better or worse, until death do we part“. To often the role of the care giver in these situations is overlooked and they are left to battle their own demons in often miserable circumstances. So here is the letter that appeared on the web site “malecare advanced prostate cancer.”

http://advancedprostatecancer.net/

So True

So True

As I have said before, the true unsung heroes of our fight against advanced prostate cancer are our caretakers. Our caretakers are our saints, they help educate us, they advocate for us, they shield us and they make us as complete as we can possibly be. They improve our lives and help us get through the day with love and enjoyment.

Sadly, they do this for us at great personal costs. A caretaker posted the following on the advanced prostate cancer online support group. I thought that it was important for all of us, both prostate cancer survivor and caretaker. It talks of her frustrations, pain, her reality.

I attempted to read the link but the uro site wasn’t very friendly. That said, I could say that as a spouse I know more about prostate cancer than I ever wanted to know.

My husband is so overwhelmed by the medical jargon, poor explanations by previous oncologists (yes, we fired him) the confusing sounding names of medications, treatments and just about everything to do with his cancer. I do the research, find layman friendly articles and generally find myself explaining to him what is going on with his disease progression.

I have an advantage by being a nurse but yet to understand some of the information I too need a medical dictionary. It is overwhelming. I am not just the wife and support, but his advocate in wading through a confusing and scary disease that has no cure at this stage.

My husband doesn’t avoid his diagnosis, disease, treatment and projected outcomes but doesn’t want any doctor to give him time frames. He tells them to tell me. Luckily, we haven’t come to that. He talks openly about how he feels, what side effects he thinks he might be experiencing and he does read the brochures or booklets provided by the pharmaceutical companies. He is better about discussing his feelings, side effects and does ask questions when we see his oncologists.

We have been dealing with prostate cancer for 10 years. This month is the anniversary of his prostatectomy and he was clear for two years after that. His rising PSA began in 2006 and become hormone resistance in 2011. He had soft tissue mets initially followed by bone mets. He has taken Provenge, Zytiga and Xtandi

He depends on me, each step of the way, to explain the treatments, CT scans, lab reports and what it all means. I have been understanding of him, frustrated, sad and grieve for the loss of his energy and his sexuality.

I tell him when he needs to go talk to someone because he’s being an angry jerk. He tells me when he doesn’t want to know what I know medically or see on CT reports. I never explained the last one to him, only that his bone mets had progressed. He didn’t ask, I don’t volunteer.

I have never pushed or asked for our sexual relationship to resume because I am educated and know it won’t. Period. Hormones to suppress testosterone suppress libido and women need to know that. We have talked about it but it isn’t important. He is alive. There’s more to a relationship than sex.

I have this wonderful group for support and encouraged him to get involved but after years of a government job he swore after he retired at 60 to never have to log onto a computer daily again! He likes when I read him your posts.

I also have a group of women I am close with at the touch of a keyboard or phone and they provide a tremendous amount of support and we all stay on top of the new drugs and treatments available for our guys! We support each other when we are frustrated.

Maybe a study on how patients and their caregivers find and are given information so that they could understand would be a good one as well as how they cope day-to-day.

I admit I am stressed, anxious and recently I have been diagnosed with stress related hypertension, but I find my own outlets of talking to my “blue sisters” emailing them, Face Booking them, reading and responding to group posts and by Humor. Humor has always been my shield and I joke with my own doctor that I am fine and she will know when I’m not when they call her and tell her I have been picked up for marching in my own parade nude down Main Street!

Am I worried I won’t do a good job taking care of my husband when he can no longer care for himself? Absolutely, but I will do the best I can. I try to take care of myself and not think of the possibility that I will be alone, I have been alone before and I will survive. We all will be with each other.

I read, walk, paint and still work part-time and have a network of family and friends who are a great support.
I would like to read further studies if I could ever get the uro website to function!

I give virtual hugs, bright blessings and heartfelt thanks to all who post on this group, who live with the stress of this disease, the uncertainty and the pain. Pain both emotionally and physically. As a spouse, caregiver and advocate all I can say is Keep Up The Fight! Support PC research! Love each other! “

Take My Hand My Love

Take My Hand My Love

AMEN and

Thank you God

Lee aka Popeye

A bit of this and a bit of that

with one comment


A growth Industry

A growth Industry

A Personal Update

I have deliberately delayed writing an article until now, as a lot of things are still up in the air for me at the moment. I was trying to wait things out so I could have something definite to report on my progress or regression whichever it may happen to be. The past two weeks have also brought a week of gales, storm surges, beach erosion and a cyclone crossing just north of my place. I also had a nasty fall over a week ago and apart from some skin missing,  I fear I have damaged a rib or two. This has caused me a fair bit of pain and slowed me down quite a bit.

So to fill in a bit of a gap I decided I had best produce this little filler as an update for my readers until the following test results have returned. I have had a bowel screen test and I will be having a PSA test done tomorrow. I am scheduled to have a cystoscopy on the 26th February.(camera inserted into the urethra and bladder area) This is to investigate the blood in the urine issue, which continues to persist. I should have all the results to hand at the end of this month and should be an indication of where I am heading.

The past few weeks have been a little concerning as I had a bout of prostatitis and this  has led to a fair bit of groin and loin pain along with increased tiredness and leg weakness. Then along comes the fall and the rib and chest pains are now added to the load. Sounds pretty bleak as I re-read what I have written here but I am still upbeat, happy and look forward to each day.

Some interesting Cancer News

A recent news article caught my attention regarding the fact that cancer death has now overtaken heart disease as the major killer of Australians. Here are a couple of extracts for my readers

The Heart Foundation says while cancer may have overtaken heart disease as Australia’s biggest killer, when cardiovascular disease is looked at as a whole, it adds up to be the most common cause of death.

Heart Foundation national director Dr Rob Grenfell says cardiovascular disease, which includes strokes as well as heart and vascular diseases, killed 45,622 people in 2011.

It was closely followed by cancer, which claimed the lives of 43,721 Australians.

Heart disease alone killed 21,500.

Dr Grenfell says cancer and cardiovascular disease have common risk factors such as smoking, obesity and inactivity and could be tackled together.

“As a group of diseases, cancers and cardiovascular diseases are attributable to 60 per cent of the country’s deaths and both are largely preventable,” he said.

“If we were to have a coordinated approach to the management of these risk factors we would reduce the prevalence of preventable deaths.”

In Other Reports

World wide there were 8.2 million deaths from cancer in 2012 and doctors predict global cancer rates will increase by three-quarters over the next two decades and they expect 20 million new diagnosed cases by 2025.

Tobacco use is biggest risk factor, accounting for 70 per cent of lung cancer deaths.

Africa, Asia, Central and South America account for 70 per cent of world’s cancer deaths.

In Australia and other Western countries, the rise in cancer cases has been attributed to ageing populations and increased screening.

Lifestyle has also been highlighted as a major factor, with cancer particularly prevalent in countries where people have a poor diet and inactive lifestyles, and countries with high smoking rates.

Alcohol is a class one known carcinogen, it’s listed by the World Health Organisation as such.”

Research shows women’s risk of breast cancer can increase by having as little as one alcoholic drink a day. For men, the risk of tumours increases with two to three drinks a day.

Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed form of cancer in Australia, with the Cancer Council putting the number of diagnoses in 2009 at 21,800.

Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia chief executive Anthony Lowe says more than 3,300 Australian men die from the disease each year and one in four men over 85 will develop it.

Can we stop this trend???

Can we stop this trend???

I could not resist including the following comment by a reader of these news releases as a matter of interest for my readers.

“Neither of them are our biggest killer, alcohol is. It is not only related to heart disease and many forms of cancer, but strokes, diabetes, liver damage, depression driven suicide, obesity, plus many other diseases. Add to that 1 in 3 car deaths, drownings, pure and simple alcohol poisoning, violent deaths, poisoned unborn babies and so on. It fills up our prisons, courts, and hospitals. It takes up to 80% of all police time, the cost is astronomical. The worst of it is you can be killed in your own bed whilst being hit by a drunk driver. Unlike smoking which does little of these things, it is still advertised, still sponsors sporting events where it is sold, (And people drive home drunk) and still sold at 3 am where much of the problems occur.
Ban the advertising and sponsorship, shut the shop early. Then there is the connection between alcohol and drugs, another story for another day.”

Cheers

Lee aka Popeye.

 

Written by Lee

5 February 2014 at 9:54 pm

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