GREG'S LEGACY

Specialising in the human experience of Living with prostate cancer – warts and all

Archive for the ‘social comment’ Category

Discussion On Can Cancer Be Cured

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Is Cancer A Business

Is Cancer A Business

I am about to enter into the conspiracy view of a subject that has some rational common sense. This is not to say that I am a believer in this conspiracy theory on cancer cure but it is an issue I thought worth presenting here for my readers.

During periods of my life when in a philosophical frame of mind ( most times from the deck of a boat late at night while in a good anchorage) one of the questions I would pose to the universe from time to time was “What could exterminate the human race????? Apart from asteroid strike, comet collision or the sun disintegrating I thought about epidemic disease. The world has and continues to deal with many contagious outbreaks of disease in many forms Eg. Bubonic plague, Smallpox, Malaria and recently Ebola. I am now left wondering if the epidemic disease that deserves more attention as being the worlds largest threat is actually cancer in any of its forms.

 Thinking about what I have just written above, raises  Some other big questions that need to be answered, such as: “Is the incidence of cancer increasing in the world,” “What is causing any cancer increases” and “Can cancer be cured”??? Well, according to the World Health Organisation, the incidence of cancer is expected to increase by 70% within the next two decades. That means there will be an increase from 14 million new cases in 2012 to 25 million new cases per year by 2032. The scope of that statistic is amazing if you consider it is the equivalent of Australia’s current population, every man, woman and child being diagnosed with cancer every year. Over the same period of time cancer mortality rates world-wide are expected to increase from 8 million in 2012 to 13 million deaths per year.

The causes of the increase in cancer diagnosis is subject to speculative arguments but does correlate to the massive changes in living standards for the majority of rich countries over the past 100 years. The increase in the consumption of red meat, industrialisation and rise in air pollution, the discovery and manufacturing of chemicals used in everyday cleaning and many more influences that found their way into our modern-day way of life. The increase in life expectancy is also a reason given for the increase in cancer rates. The statistics tell us that by the age of 85, 1 in two men and 1 in three women will have experienced a cancer diagnosis during their lifetime.

While medical establishments and governments continue to advise the public that a search for the cure for cancer continues, the cure remains as elusive as ever. What the medical and pharmaceutical establishments have been very succesful at; Is in the overall management of cancer treatment including improved screening methods. Advances in the initial primary treatments of surgery, radiation and chemotherapy have been amazing as has the success of new cancer drugs developed. As a result of these advances the 5 and 10 year survival rate for cancer patients has increased dramatically.

This then brings us to the key issue of this article and the question “Can cancer be cured” ?????  Well now, this statement raises a whole lot of other assumptions because if you look at cancer treatment worldwide from a business point of view, you will soon realise it is worth an under-estimated trillion dollars annually and is also a growth industry. The conspiracy theorists could be forgiven for asking the question in this way “ Why would a trillion-dollar a year growth industry want to find a cure and close itself down”???????

If the true answer is in favour of the conspiracy theorists there are two main sides that need to be given more thought: The world is based on capitalism. Even if you happen to be Russian, Chinese or whatever, the money-go-round is essential for our wellbeing. Consider this. Huge profits are made by large corporations and distributed to share holders who in turn will use those funds in other areas. Thousands of individual people including medical researchers throughout the world, also earn a living from this industry. On the other side of the coin, moral issues need satisfying when you consider that every family on earth will be touched by cancer in one form or another. Time will be the judge on this matter in the long-term. As Popeye might of said “It is what it is, and that’s all that it is.”

Is this Humanity??

Is this Humanity??

My personal view is that with advances in screening recently and those expected in the future, most early cancers can be cured successfully. I have a belief that new types of cancers will appear as time goes by as a consequence of lifestyle changes affecting our lives in the future. Generally I feel that sadly, cancer will be with us for many years to come.

Lee aka Popeye

Living with a Stoma after an Ostomy

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There is always another way

There is always another way

Here I sit three months after my radical surgery that has given me a new lease on life and I feel healthier than I have been for the past three years. The surgery has also left me a legacy of dealing with a stoma and the new physical disciplines and mental attitudes associated with my new plumbing arrangements. Very basically there are two types either a colostomy (bowel) or urostomy (urine) both of which utilise a bag or pouch placed over a stoma to collect waste and changed out frequently.

 

Ostomy surgeries are usually performed for a variety of medical reasons such as endometriosis, crohns disease or cancer. The surgical formation of a stoma can save a patient’s life and provide a near normal quality of life than would otherwise be the case. At the time of my surgery there was a chance that I might have had both types of stoma’s installed as it was unclear if the surgery might damage the bowel as well. However luck was with me and the surgeon when all went well and I received the urostomy stoma only.

A whole new experience opens up for patients receiving a stoma. First and foremost is the arrival into your life of the stoma nurse who is a trained specialist nurse. The stoma nurse is responsible for educating the patients on stoma care and hygiene. The nurse is also responsible for training the patient in the use of equipment necessary to apply to stoma’s. The stoma nurse is also the first point of contact to whom the patient will report to on a regular basis. The patient will find themselves members of the Australian Ostomy Association which allows them access to a free monthly allocations of bags, pouches or other equipment, but postage costs do apply. The association also publishes a magazine on a regular basis with much valuable information for patients.

I have settled into a routine easily enough and am truly grateful for the good health I now feel. I still haven’t got back my strength fully and some days are better than others but overall I feel almost normal. I will never be able to say I believe my cancer is gone for good, but my PSA is now undetectable and I know that at least all the cancer that was known to be still active has been removed. Still, there are some issues with having the urostomy that I need to explain for readers.

Since my urine is now flowing via a conduit through my abdomen (just to the right of the navel) into a collection bag it can be subject to leaks. Leaks occur without warning when seals or base plates degrade, fold up or let go. I have trialled different types with and without seals and have finally settled on what I consider the most reliable. This apparatus normally will give me two days and nights (with daily bag changes) without failure. The bags normally need draining approx every couple of hours or when about a third full and is a simple procedure of turning on the tap over a toilet bowel. For night-time I hook my bag up to a larger night bag and this is emptied and cleaned each morning.

From time to time I have experienced leaks with the worst case being a leak during the night from either the stoma fitting or a night bag leak. I have tried to pre-empt these disasters by using a waterproof blanket under my bed-sheet and a tray under the night bag. Still accidents will happen and I have to deal with them and the clean ups as they occur. Leakages that happen while out and about are dealt with by a bag that I carry with a change of clothes plus equipment to change on the stoma. Even though a leak event is fairly uncommon it is still a mental issue for me and affects where and when I go anywhere and what I take with me. I now tend not to travel if accommodation is a factor and when I do travel, I prefer to be in my own car with all the equipment I need. Heading into the city on business is controlled by my knowledge of the location of public toilets and preferably the handicapped ones.

As I have often said before cancer is as much about the effects of cancer treatments for patients apart from the effects of the cancer itself. Cancer is a catalyst for all sorts of a domino fiasco’s introducing all sorts of impacts on a patients life. My pathway to where I am today is testament to what I have just said, however I would like to say that I am extremely grateful to be still here. Medical opinion was in agreement that my used-by date was approx last christmas if the surgery had not taken place. Learning to cope physically and mentally with my latest hurdle is a small price to pay for the extension of my used-by date especially when I feel as well as I do at the moment.

Graphic of a Urostomy Stoma

Graphic of a Urostomy Stoma

“I can do this …………and I can do it with a smile.”

Lee aka Popeye

 

My God Box Adventure

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My God Box

My God Box

Welcome back for the year 2015. I hope everyone enjoyed the festivities and I sincerely hope that the new year will bring health, prosperity and peace to the world. In this article I have decided to write about a subject dealing with spirituality. I have been inspired to do this by an event that happened accidentally toward the end of my treatment for the gross hematuria I was experiencing. When I was at my spiritual lowest point during my illness, full of despair and accepting that I could be reaching the end of my life, a friend came to me and suggested the following idea.

My friend suggested I create a “God Box.” The idea being that I acquire a small box of some type where I could write down on little slips of paper all my fears, anxieties, problems or prayers and deposit them into the box for God to look after. Once these fears were deposited I could then just let go of them knowing they were in the hands of a higher authority.

Now I have never been a pious religious person who was a regular churchgoer, but I always retained a sense of confirmation that there existed a God that was responsible for all creation. The “God Box” suggestion just captured my imagination and fell in line with my overall belief in a creator. I believe that everything in life happens for a reason, both good and bad. I also believe my life has been directed at certain times by someone other than me when events have caused me to travel in different directions than I thought possible. So the search for a suitable box began and my wife took exactly 2 hours to locate the perfect box in a local op shop for $2.00. ( A picture is included at the head of this article.)

I began depositing my little slips of paper containing my fears just weeks prior to the investigations that revealed the full extent of my serious condition and the surgical suggestion that could (and has done) saved my life. It was during this period that a volunteer chaplain visited me in hospital and seeing the “God Box” at the head of my bed asked me about it. After I told my story she was amazed and delighted and then commented by asking if I included any “Thank You” notes among the little pieces of paper I was depositing. It was then that I realised with embarrassment that my little notes were all one way with no such words of gratitude given by me, I fixed this issue straight away.

Readers can choose what they say or think about my story here but I can say for myself that my “God Box” came about as a suggestion from a friend during a dark period of my illness. This little box changed my life at the time and continues to do so. It gave me great comfort and hope while easing the fears, the stress and despondency I was feeling. From the time I accepted the concept of my little box and proceeded to deposit my little notes, my health outlook took a turn for the better. I believe that little box entered my life at just the right time and brought about changes that resulted in my successful surgery. It also reinvigorated my spiritual awareness.

Some Good Advice

Some Good Advice

I originally thought this was quite a unique idea that my friend suggested to me but I have since discovered the concept has been well-known and used for hundreds of years by many religious faiths. I have included a few links to web sites for readers who may be interested in further reading. I decided to write this article in the hope that the “God Box” idea might be of interest and give comfort to other chronically ill patients or their carers doing it tough out there. “Thank you God”

Further Reading

http://theuntoldstory.guru/2014/08/25-ways-to-use-prayer-boxes/

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/relationships/the-god-box-transferring-your-troubles-to-a-higher-authority/article4210039/

http://www.realsimple.com/work-life/family/relationships/inside-god-box

 

 

Regards

Lee aka Popeye

Blood In The Urine, Radiation Cystitus And My Prostate Cancer Management.

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And so can opinions

And so can opinions

I feel compelled to write this article to summarise all the major medical events that have led me to where I stand today. I write exposing my experiences with this disease and the medical to-ing and fro-ing from the medical side of my disease management. I feel that some of these medical decisions and procedures I have personally experienced have left me puzzled. Perhaps my story may be of assistance or support to those who may be experiencing the same issues or for those who may yet come down the same paths. Before I begin I would like to state the following:

“I am not a doctor and the views I present here are purely personal and are private opinions only”.

I have deliberately refrained from specifically mentioning doctors names in this or any of my past articles to maintain anonymity for those medical professionals I have encountered. Medical personnel, be they doctors, specialists, nurses or assistants are human just like everyone else. There are many stages of competence within the profession. Sometimes mistakes are made and sometimes an inspired insight may provide a miraculous cure. In almost all of these professionals there is a desire to be as good as they can be. However natural abilities will vary enormously just as in any other profession. The trick for patients to learn is being able to recognise the variations in those treating the illness.

I remember, way back in 1993 I had an operation on my back and while recuperating I received one of those spooky insights that happen from time to time. It was in the form of a remark from a disgruntled fellow patient in the bed opposite me and was spoken to me as I was about to leave the hospital. He called me over and said the following: ” Just remember lad, when you get back home that they don’t call a doctor’s office a medical practice for no reason”. He motioned me closer to him then said “the emphasis is on the word practice“. In a way I guess you could say his remark supports the cliché of getting a second opinion on medical matters.

I live in the regional area of Mackay Queensland Australia, Ah! such a beautiful area. It seems like such a long time ago in March 2012 when I was diagnosed with prostate cancer. My PSA at the time of diagnosis was only 6.5 having risen from 4.4 a couple of months previously. The pathology identified a Gleason 9 (4+5) in all 18 core samples with tumour volume of between 80% and 100% , the grading was a T3a. That diagnosis led to two alternatives. The first urologist advised surgery and a second opinion from a different urologist advised it was inoperable and this was supported by opinions from two further specialists in Brisbane. These specialists all recommended Androgen Deprivation Therapy plus HD brachytherapy followed by external beam radiation. I then accepted this advice as the way I should choose.

Covering all bases

Covering all bases

The urologist then referred me to the two specialists in Brisbane to begin the brachytherapy in May. When I finally consulted with these specialists they were annoyed as they had not been advised that I was symptomatic with urinary problems (the reason my cancer was discovered in the first place was because I had urinary symptoms.) They sent me straight back to Mackay to get this sorted out prior to having further treatment. I underwent a TURP procedure in May where the urologist removed a third of my prostate tissue during the rebore to alleviate my symptoms. After my discharge from hospital I contracted an infection that took months to resolve.

Finally in September my urologist referred me back to the specialists in Brisbane to undergo the HD brachytherapy. It was at this meeting in Brisbane that I discovered that because I had undergone the TURP procedure with so much tissue removed I was no longer a candidate for HD brachytherapy. I was then offered a full course of external beam IMRT radiation with the continuation of the ADT medication.

I eventually received a full course of IMRT at the Sunshine Coast in Queensland, 38 days of radiation for a total of 78 Gy. My PSA dropped to a nadir of 0.02 over the ensuing months and I also continued my ADT medication. In March 2014 I had been diagnosed for two years and as my PSA had remained stable I was given the OK to stop the ADT medication. My latest PSA result in June 2014 remains at 0.02.

Back in March 2013 My urologist and I had a disagreement when he offered to perform an orchidectomy procedure (surgical castration) prior to me leaving the private health system. As a result I discontinued our medical relationship. In August 2013 I began having visible minor bleeding in the urine from time to time. This steadily became more frequent and was identified in pathology when I presented to my GP with this issue.

I eventually had a cystoscopy as a public patient that was performed by the original urologist I consulted way back on diagnosis day. He also undertook consultation work at the Mackay public hospital. After the procedure he diagnosed radiation cystitis to the bladder wall and referred me to the radiation oncologist based in Townsville. The radiation oncologist then referred me to the hyperbaric medical unit in Townsville general hospital where I underwent treatment (This has been outlined in detail in a previous post.)

During my hyperbaric treatment I experienced severe bleeding and urinary retention on two separate occasions requiring admission to the hospital emergency department in the middle of the night. The emergency department personnel were great, admitting me immediately and were able to catheterise me on both occasions, however my time there was painful and distressing. (A full coverage of this can be read on my two previous posts.) The only treatment I received, was the bladder irrigation via the catheter and at no time was it suggested to me, that they might try a further investigation to confirm the cause of the bleeding, nor carry out any cauterisation. I managed to see the medical registrar on four occasions for a total time of approx 4 minutes but never saw a urologist. Both times I was discharged when the urine finally cleared of blood.

interestingly I recently received copies of blood tests that were done when I was receiving treatment at the hospital and all my blood counts were below normal. I now wonder if these low blood counts were serious enough at the time to have warranted further treatment.

It was during my hospitalisation that I was approached by a fellow patient with similar issues. He recommended I see his personal urologist in Townsville who he valued highly for an opinion. I was able to organised a referral and saw the urologist as a private patient and was immediately impressed. This has also been covered in a previous post but it is worth repeating here. He performed a cystoscopy and found the following (This is from his report):

There was a small submeatal stenosis which was passable ( a stricture–narrowing of the opening of the urethra ( this can be caused by catheter use) The prostatic fossa (the prostate capsule or prostate bed) was quite open and there were quite a lot of radiation affected vessels which were very friable. These were diathermied (cauterised) Both uretic orifices were normal and there were no calculi (stones) There was no radiation cystitis in the bladder or any papillary lesions. Sooooo there you go, a different diagnosis from a second opinion. Seems like the bleeding was from the remains of the prostate gland and not the bladder.

It has taken me quite a few weeks to get over this procedure and I am still battling with urinary issues including pain and incontinence. It is steadily improving and I am hopeful that I will return to normal at some stage. The important thing is that the bleeding has settled down. I did have some slight bleeding from time to time and I did pass a few clots but the incidence of this is fading fast as the weeks go by. I am scheduled to have a tele conference with the urologist in two weeks where I will get a chance to ask him further questions on my prognosis with the bleeding.

Here then is my summary of discord:

While I know that I had no alternative but to have the TURP procedure and I am grateful to the urologist that it resolved my urinary problems. However, I am left wondering how he was unaware it would rule me out for the brachytherapy treatment before he shunted me to Brisbane. Later, his offer to perform the orchidectomy was put to me in a way that offended me and as far as I could see had no basis of offering me any cure.

The first diagnosis of radiation cystitis in the bladder wall is at odds with my second cystoscopy diagnoses. I still wonder, why???

I have searched for information regarding the issue of bleeding from the prostate gland after radiation with little results. If this is indeed a possible side effect as it appears to be with me, would it have been advisable to have had the prostate surgically removed in the first place??

During my hospitalisation, should the hospital have carried out further investigative measures, particularly when I turned up two weeks after the first visit for the second admission???

I have now been treated both as a private and a public patient and it offends me that private patients are given general anaesthetic for procedures such as a biopsy or a cystoscopy, but not if you are a public patient. Both these procedures are distressing to endure without general anaesthetic. In the public system you will receive an anaesthetic gel which is next to useless.

Regrets I've had a few.....but then again too few to mention.

Regrets I’ve had a few…..but then again too few to mention.

 

The medical management road for patients with chronic illness is a mine field of pitfalls with choices offered by medical opinions. Patients should endeavour to research and learn as much as they can about their condition. Please be aware however, that knowledge is a two edge sword and being able to rationally dissect the good from the bad and remain as objective as you can is the best advice I can offer. I keep copies of all my medical records and I try to keep a diary. Lastly never be afraid to seek a second, third or fourth opinion. After two and a half years of my illness I am still seeking information and knowledge regarding my prognosis.

Cheers

Lee aka Popeye

 

A Cancer Patient Caregiver Perspective

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You Are The The Wind Beneath My Wings

You Are The The Wind Beneath My Wings

In my course of seeking information on all aspects of prostate cancer and cancer in general, I have a list of favourite sites I visit daily to keep me up to date with the latest issues. I have just come away from one of these sites nearly in tears with one of the articles offered regarding a brief compendium from a spouse of a man. This article is one of the most powerful and revealing insights into what it means to be a loving partner and care giver to a spouse who has been diagnosed with this horrible disease.

I do not care if I am infringing on any copy write prohibitions by posting this article here on this site, as I think this information deserves a wider appreciation by readers. I apologise in advance if anyone may be offended, but I believe this is an important disclosure that uplifts the spirit on what it means to love someone and confirms the vows of:  “In sickness and health, for better or worse, until death do we part“. To often the role of the care giver in these situations is overlooked and they are left to battle their own demons in often miserable circumstances. So here is the letter that appeared on the web site “malecare advanced prostate cancer.”

http://advancedprostatecancer.net/

So True

So True

As I have said before, the true unsung heroes of our fight against advanced prostate cancer are our caretakers. Our caretakers are our saints, they help educate us, they advocate for us, they shield us and they make us as complete as we can possibly be. They improve our lives and help us get through the day with love and enjoyment.

Sadly, they do this for us at great personal costs. A caretaker posted the following on the advanced prostate cancer online support group. I thought that it was important for all of us, both prostate cancer survivor and caretaker. It talks of her frustrations, pain, her reality.

I attempted to read the link but the uro site wasn’t very friendly. That said, I could say that as a spouse I know more about prostate cancer than I ever wanted to know.

My husband is so overwhelmed by the medical jargon, poor explanations by previous oncologists (yes, we fired him) the confusing sounding names of medications, treatments and just about everything to do with his cancer. I do the research, find layman friendly articles and generally find myself explaining to him what is going on with his disease progression.

I have an advantage by being a nurse but yet to understand some of the information I too need a medical dictionary. It is overwhelming. I am not just the wife and support, but his advocate in wading through a confusing and scary disease that has no cure at this stage.

My husband doesn’t avoid his diagnosis, disease, treatment and projected outcomes but doesn’t want any doctor to give him time frames. He tells them to tell me. Luckily, we haven’t come to that. He talks openly about how he feels, what side effects he thinks he might be experiencing and he does read the brochures or booklets provided by the pharmaceutical companies. He is better about discussing his feelings, side effects and does ask questions when we see his oncologists.

We have been dealing with prostate cancer for 10 years. This month is the anniversary of his prostatectomy and he was clear for two years after that. His rising PSA began in 2006 and become hormone resistance in 2011. He had soft tissue mets initially followed by bone mets. He has taken Provenge, Zytiga and Xtandi

He depends on me, each step of the way, to explain the treatments, CT scans, lab reports and what it all means. I have been understanding of him, frustrated, sad and grieve for the loss of his energy and his sexuality.

I tell him when he needs to go talk to someone because he’s being an angry jerk. He tells me when he doesn’t want to know what I know medically or see on CT reports. I never explained the last one to him, only that his bone mets had progressed. He didn’t ask, I don’t volunteer.

I have never pushed or asked for our sexual relationship to resume because I am educated and know it won’t. Period. Hormones to suppress testosterone suppress libido and women need to know that. We have talked about it but it isn’t important. He is alive. There’s more to a relationship than sex.

I have this wonderful group for support and encouraged him to get involved but after years of a government job he swore after he retired at 60 to never have to log onto a computer daily again! He likes when I read him your posts.

I also have a group of women I am close with at the touch of a keyboard or phone and they provide a tremendous amount of support and we all stay on top of the new drugs and treatments available for our guys! We support each other when we are frustrated.

Maybe a study on how patients and their caregivers find and are given information so that they could understand would be a good one as well as how they cope day-to-day.

I admit I am stressed, anxious and recently I have been diagnosed with stress related hypertension, but I find my own outlets of talking to my “blue sisters” emailing them, Face Booking them, reading and responding to group posts and by Humor. Humor has always been my shield and I joke with my own doctor that I am fine and she will know when I’m not when they call her and tell her I have been picked up for marching in my own parade nude down Main Street!

Am I worried I won’t do a good job taking care of my husband when he can no longer care for himself? Absolutely, but I will do the best I can. I try to take care of myself and not think of the possibility that I will be alone, I have been alone before and I will survive. We all will be with each other.

I read, walk, paint and still work part-time and have a network of family and friends who are a great support.
I would like to read further studies if I could ever get the uro website to function!

I give virtual hugs, bright blessings and heartfelt thanks to all who post on this group, who live with the stress of this disease, the uncertainty and the pain. Pain both emotionally and physically. As a spouse, caregiver and advocate all I can say is Keep Up The Fight! Support PC research! Love each other! “

Take My Hand My Love

Take My Hand My Love

AMEN and

Thank you God

Lee aka Popeye

A bit of this and a bit of that

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A growth Industry

A growth Industry

A Personal Update

I have deliberately delayed writing an article until now, as a lot of things are still up in the air for me at the moment. I was trying to wait things out so I could have something definite to report on my progress or regression whichever it may happen to be. The past two weeks have also brought a week of gales, storm surges, beach erosion and a cyclone crossing just north of my place. I also had a nasty fall over a week ago and apart from some skin missing,  I fear I have damaged a rib or two. This has caused me a fair bit of pain and slowed me down quite a bit.

So to fill in a bit of a gap I decided I had best produce this little filler as an update for my readers until the following test results have returned. I have had a bowel screen test and I will be having a PSA test done tomorrow. I am scheduled to have a cystoscopy on the 26th February.(camera inserted into the urethra and bladder area) This is to investigate the blood in the urine issue, which continues to persist. I should have all the results to hand at the end of this month and should be an indication of where I am heading.

The past few weeks have been a little concerning as I had a bout of prostatitis and this  has led to a fair bit of groin and loin pain along with increased tiredness and leg weakness. Then along comes the fall and the rib and chest pains are now added to the load. Sounds pretty bleak as I re-read what I have written here but I am still upbeat, happy and look forward to each day.

Some interesting Cancer News

A recent news article caught my attention regarding the fact that cancer death has now overtaken heart disease as the major killer of Australians. Here are a couple of extracts for my readers

The Heart Foundation says while cancer may have overtaken heart disease as Australia’s biggest killer, when cardiovascular disease is looked at as a whole, it adds up to be the most common cause of death.

Heart Foundation national director Dr Rob Grenfell says cardiovascular disease, which includes strokes as well as heart and vascular diseases, killed 45,622 people in 2011.

It was closely followed by cancer, which claimed the lives of 43,721 Australians.

Heart disease alone killed 21,500.

Dr Grenfell says cancer and cardiovascular disease have common risk factors such as smoking, obesity and inactivity and could be tackled together.

“As a group of diseases, cancers and cardiovascular diseases are attributable to 60 per cent of the country’s deaths and both are largely preventable,” he said.

“If we were to have a coordinated approach to the management of these risk factors we would reduce the prevalence of preventable deaths.”

In Other Reports

World wide there were 8.2 million deaths from cancer in 2012 and doctors predict global cancer rates will increase by three-quarters over the next two decades and they expect 20 million new diagnosed cases by 2025.

Tobacco use is biggest risk factor, accounting for 70 per cent of lung cancer deaths.

Africa, Asia, Central and South America account for 70 per cent of world’s cancer deaths.

In Australia and other Western countries, the rise in cancer cases has been attributed to ageing populations and increased screening.

Lifestyle has also been highlighted as a major factor, with cancer particularly prevalent in countries where people have a poor diet and inactive lifestyles, and countries with high smoking rates.

Alcohol is a class one known carcinogen, it’s listed by the World Health Organisation as such.”

Research shows women’s risk of breast cancer can increase by having as little as one alcoholic drink a day. For men, the risk of tumours increases with two to three drinks a day.

Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed form of cancer in Australia, with the Cancer Council putting the number of diagnoses in 2009 at 21,800.

Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia chief executive Anthony Lowe says more than 3,300 Australian men die from the disease each year and one in four men over 85 will develop it.

Can we stop this trend???

Can we stop this trend???

I could not resist including the following comment by a reader of these news releases as a matter of interest for my readers.

“Neither of them are our biggest killer, alcohol is. It is not only related to heart disease and many forms of cancer, but strokes, diabetes, liver damage, depression driven suicide, obesity, plus many other diseases. Add to that 1 in 3 car deaths, drownings, pure and simple alcohol poisoning, violent deaths, poisoned unborn babies and so on. It fills up our prisons, courts, and hospitals. It takes up to 80% of all police time, the cost is astronomical. The worst of it is you can be killed in your own bed whilst being hit by a drunk driver. Unlike smoking which does little of these things, it is still advertised, still sponsors sporting events where it is sold, (And people drive home drunk) and still sold at 3 am where much of the problems occur.
Ban the advertising and sponsorship, shut the shop early. Then there is the connection between alcohol and drugs, another story for another day.”

Cheers

Lee aka Popeye.

 

Written by Lee

5 February 2014 at 9:54 pm

Welcome back for 2014

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Fitzroy Island Christmas 2013

Fitzroy Island Christmas 2013

Hello to all my readers for 2014. I hope you all had a wonderful festive season as I did and are looking as optimistic as I am for the coming year. My wife and I spent a magical three days over Christmas with both our son’s and daughter’s families at beautiful Fitzroy Island near Cairns, I have purposely not submitted an article until now, as I was hoping to report on much more than I can do in this issue, however a much fuller report must wait for now, until things become a little clearer during February.

Back in November 2013 my pathology reports were very good apart from the discovery of blood in my urine. At the time I was told that I could look forward to a procedure called a cystoscopy that involves a camera being inserted into my urethra to investigate the problem. This procedure would likely take place within a three-month period. So I figured my blood in the urine symptom was not as urgent as I had imagined due to the long wait for the procedure to take place. I was aware that this symptom could be caused by the radiation treatment I received twelve months previously and or many other reasons from a dire prognosis of other cancer problems or to every day mild infections. I was also feeling extremely healthy at the time with good energy reserves and normal mental functioning so I have not been overly concerned with the wait.

I have now been told the procedure will take place on the 19th February so I should have further news on this issue around the middle to late February to report back on this website. The blood in the urine discovered in the pathology confirmed what is known as microscopic hematuria, however I was aware of the problem for some time previously as I had periods of gross hematuria where the blood was extremely visible from time to time. Over the previous two months I have experienced periodic episodes of gross bleeding with the passing of clots from time to time. Now this may sound like it should be a bit of a worry but I have been feeling so much better within myself otherwise, that I am not overly concerned for the moment until the results of this procedure are known.

I guess you could say, that because of my overall other health benefits at the moment, it is my belief that this problem is the result of my own bodies immune system, repairing itself and ridding the crud out of my system from all the horrible things that have taken place in my pelvis since I was diagnosed back in March 2012. I have no way of knowing if my hunch is right until hopefully by the end of February when I will know for sure if my optimism will be justified.

In all other health areas my pathology tests and body scans have confirmed that I am in better shape than I have been for the past two years. None of the scans show any spread to the bones or organs, my PSA remains almost undetectable. My blood pressure is the best it has ever been, my sugar levels are now back to normal, my cholesterol levels are also normal and my liver function tests are also OK. The best part is, I actually feel healthier than I have for a long time. The doctors have agreed that if my PSA remains undetectable at my next test due in February that I will be able to come off the hormone implant therapy (ADT ) in March and that is great news for me.

So that brings me to the end of this article for the time being and I look forward to be able to present a favourable report on the cystoscopy procedure in due course. In the meantime I will continue to enjoy my new-found sense of wellbeing.

On board the old boat Fitzroy Island 2013

On board the old boat Fitzroy Island 2013

Lee aka Popeye

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