GREG'S LEGACY

Specialising in the human experience of Living with prostate cancer – warts and all

Blood In The Urine, Radiation Cystitus And My Prostate Cancer Management.

leave a comment »


 

And so can opinions

And so can opinions

I feel compelled to write this article to summarise all the major medical events that have led me to where I stand today. I write exposing my experiences with this disease and the medical to-ing and fro-ing from the medical side of my disease management. I feel that some of these medical decisions and procedures I have personally experienced have left me puzzled. Perhaps my story may be of assistance or support to those who may be experiencing the same issues or for those who may yet come down the same paths. Before I begin I would like to state the following:

“I am not a doctor and the views I present here are purely personal and are private opinions only”.

I have deliberately refrained from specifically mentioning doctors names in this or any of my past articles to maintain anonymity for those medical professionals I have encountered. Medical personnel, be they doctors, specialists, nurses or assistants are human just like everyone else. There are many stages of competence within the profession. Sometimes mistakes are made and sometimes an inspired insight may provide a miraculous cure. In almost all of these professionals there is a desire to be as good as they can be. However natural abilities will vary enormously just as in any other profession. The trick for patients to learn is being able to recognise the variations in those treating the illness.

I remember, way back in 1993 I had an operation on my back and while recuperating I received one of those spooky insights that happen from time to time. It was in the form of a remark from a disgruntled fellow patient in the bed opposite me and was spoken to me as I was about to leave the hospital. He called me over and said the following: ” Just remember lad, when you get back home that they don’t call a doctor’s office a medical practice for no reason”. He motioned me closer to him then said “the emphasis is on the word practice“. In a way I guess you could say his remark supports the cliché of getting a second opinion on medical matters.

I live in the regional area of Mackay Queensland Australia, Ah! such a beautiful area. It seems like such a long time ago in March 2012 when I was diagnosed with prostate cancer. My PSA at the time of diagnosis was only 6.5 having risen from 4.4 a couple of months previously. The pathology identified a Gleason 9 (4+5) in all 18 core samples with tumour volume of between 80% and 100% , the grading was a T3a. That diagnosis led to two alternatives. The first urologist advised surgery and a second opinion from a different urologist advised it was inoperable and this was supported by opinions from two further specialists in Brisbane. These specialists all recommended Androgen Deprivation Therapy plus HD brachytherapy followed by external beam radiation. I then accepted this advice as the way I should choose.

Covering all bases

Covering all bases

The urologist then referred me to the two specialists in Brisbane to begin the brachytherapy in May. When I finally consulted with these specialists they were annoyed as they had not been advised that I was symptomatic with urinary problems (the reason my cancer was discovered in the first place was because I had urinary symptoms.) They sent me straight back to Mackay to get this sorted out prior to having further treatment. I underwent a TURP procedure in May where the urologist removed a third of my prostate tissue during the rebore to alleviate my symptoms. After my discharge from hospital I contracted an infection that took months to resolve.

Finally in September my urologist referred me back to the specialists in Brisbane to undergo the HD brachytherapy. It was at this meeting in Brisbane that I discovered that because I had undergone the TURP procedure with so much tissue removed I was no longer a candidate for HD brachytherapy. I was then offered a full course of external beam IMRT radiation with the continuation of the ADT medication.

I eventually received a full course of IMRT at the Sunshine Coast in Queensland, 38 days of radiation for a total of 78 Gy. My PSA dropped to a nadir of 0.02 over the ensuing months and I also continued my ADT medication. In March 2014 I had been diagnosed for two years and as my PSA had remained stable I was given the OK to stop the ADT medication. My latest PSA result in June 2014 remains at 0.02.

Back in March 2013 My urologist and I had a disagreement when he offered to perform an orchidectomy procedure (surgical castration) prior to me leaving the private health system. As a result I discontinued our medical relationship. In August 2013 I began having visible minor bleeding in the urine from time to time. This steadily became more frequent and was identified in pathology when I presented to my GP with this issue.

I eventually had a cystoscopy as a public patient that was performed by the original urologist I consulted way back on diagnosis day. He also undertook consultation work at the Mackay public hospital. After the procedure he diagnosed radiation cystitis to the bladder wall and referred me to the radiation oncologist based in Townsville. The radiation oncologist then referred me to the hyperbaric medical unit in Townsville general hospital where I underwent treatment (This has been outlined in detail in a previous post.)

During my hyperbaric treatment I experienced severe bleeding and urinary retention on two separate occasions requiring admission to the hospital emergency department in the middle of the night. The emergency department personnel were great, admitting me immediately and were able to catheterise me on both occasions, however my time there was painful and distressing. (A full coverage of this can be read on my two previous posts.) The only treatment I received, was the bladder irrigation via the catheter and at no time was it suggested to me, that they might try a further investigation to confirm the cause of the bleeding, nor carry out any cauterisation. I managed to see the medical registrar on four occasions for a total time of approx 4 minutes but never saw a urologist. Both times I was discharged when the urine finally cleared of blood.

interestingly I recently received copies of blood tests that were done when I was receiving treatment at the hospital and all my blood counts were below normal. I now wonder if these low blood counts were serious enough at the time to have warranted further treatment.

It was during my hospitalisation that I was approached by a fellow patient with similar issues. He recommended I see his personal urologist in Townsville who he valued highly for an opinion. I was able to organised a referral and saw the urologist as a private patient and was immediately impressed. This has also been covered in a previous post but it is worth repeating here. He performed a cystoscopy and found the following (This is from his report):

There was a small submeatal stenosis which was passable ( a stricture–narrowing of the opening of the urethra ( this can be caused by catheter use) The prostatic fossa (the prostate capsule or prostate bed) was quite open and there were quite a lot of radiation affected vessels which were very friable. These were diathermied (cauterised) Both uretic orifices were normal and there were no calculi (stones) There was no radiation cystitis in the bladder or any papillary lesions. Sooooo there you go, a different diagnosis from a second opinion. Seems like the bleeding was from the remains of the prostate gland and not the bladder.

It has taken me quite a few weeks to get over this procedure and I am still battling with urinary issues including pain and incontinence. It is steadily improving and I am hopeful that I will return to normal at some stage. The important thing is that the bleeding has settled down. I did have some slight bleeding from time to time and I did pass a few clots but the incidence of this is fading fast as the weeks go by. I am scheduled to have a tele conference with the urologist in two weeks where I will get a chance to ask him further questions on my prognosis with the bleeding.

Here then is my summary of discord:

While I know that I had no alternative but to have the TURP procedure and I am grateful to the urologist that it resolved my urinary problems. However, I am left wondering how he was unaware it would rule me out for the brachytherapy treatment before he shunted me to Brisbane. Later, his offer to perform the orchidectomy was put to me in a way that offended me and as far as I could see had no basis of offering me any cure.

The first diagnosis of radiation cystitis in the bladder wall is at odds with my second cystoscopy diagnoses. I still wonder, why???

I have searched for information regarding the issue of bleeding from the prostate gland after radiation with little results. If this is indeed a possible side effect as it appears to be with me, would it have been advisable to have had the prostate surgically removed in the first place??

During my hospitalisation, should the hospital have carried out further investigative measures, particularly when I turned up two weeks after the first visit for the second admission???

I have now been treated both as a private and a public patient and it offends me that private patients are given general anaesthetic for procedures such as a biopsy or a cystoscopy, but not if you are a public patient. Both these procedures are distressing to endure without general anaesthetic. In the public system you will receive an anaesthetic gel which is next to useless.

Regrets I've had a few.....but then again too few to mention.

Regrets I’ve had a few…..but then again too few to mention.

 

The medical management road for patients with chronic illness is a mine field of pitfalls with choices offered by medical opinions. Patients should endeavour to research and learn as much as they can about their condition. Please be aware however, that knowledge is a two edge sword and being able to rationally dissect the good from the bad and remain as objective as you can is the best advice I can offer. I keep copies of all my medical records and I try to keep a diary. Lastly never be afraid to seek a second, third or fourth opinion. After two and a half years of my illness I am still seeking information and knowledge regarding my prognosis.

Cheers

Lee aka Popeye

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: