GREG'S LEGACY

Specialising in the human experience of Living with prostate cancer – warts and all

The Spicks and Specks of a Cancer Patient

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I know it seems a while since I have published anything for readers on this site and I do have a couple of excuses to offer for my lack of effort. I Thought my last two articles could stay up front for a little extra time due to their content, and the possible benefit a person might receive who might also be doing it tough. My other excuse is that my health over the past four weeks has not been good at all, and as a result I have undergone a series of tests and scans to try and resolve some health issues.

I decided to put this article together and call it Spicks and Specks. It contains a bunch of stuff that has been happening to me over the past couple of months, plus a personal comment from me regarding cancer in general. Spicks and Specks was the title of a BeeGees song released in the mid 1960’s and I loved it. The title just seemed appropriate for this bits and pieces article.

Touching on the BeeGees has just reminded me to let my readers know that since September 22nd I have been the proud owner of a Ukulele given to me by my family as a birthday present. Prior to this and for many years I played the guitar poorly and sang even worse, however my family knew I harboured a desire to get hold of one of these little fun instruments and give it a go ( they most likely had, had enough of my guitar playing) . So here I sit looking across at my happy little hippy friend all decorated with stickers, and yes I do play Spicks and Specks on occasion. Everybody should have a Uke.

My latest blood test results were excellent and the PSA result was 0.02 almost undetectable. However I have been experiencing quite a bit of pain in the hips, groin, leg and lower back area. I also had a problem with weakness in the legs and huge fatigue issues. So after presenting to the doctors, they decided I should undergo some scans and tests which I completed and the results were all clear of progression, with one small area needing further investigation. It seems I have blood in the urine and this will involve the insertion of a camera to inspect the urethra and bladder and I will report back when the procedure has been completed.

While all this doctor visits,scans and blood tests was going on, it occurred to me how having a cancer diagnosis is all about management. My current view of cancer is that I see it as a chronic illness, just like any of the dozens of other chronic illnesses that abound. Cancer may be more prevalent than other chronic illnesses but it seems to me that having cancer of any type is still, all about the management of treatment designed to cure, or lessen the impacts and maintain and extend a patients quality of life.

Research for a cure for cancer goes on and over time humans have made many discoveries and strides forward in cancer management and treatment. When looking at some of the statistics it is interesting to see just how far we have come with testing and treatment. Consider the following:

  • One man in two will receive a cancer diagnosis by the age of eighty-five years and for women it is one in three.
  • Over 120,000 Australians will be newly diagnosed with cancer this year.
  • The good news is that the survival rate from cancer has increased by 30% in the past two decades.

I might expand on this subject of living with and managing cancer in future articles from my own personal experience and from other information freely available. It is an interesting way of life, this living with cancer stuff and it has many different facets to explore.

In my small rural community and amongst the residents I personally know, there has been one other man diagnosed with prostate cancer and three ladies diagnosed with breast cancer. All of us have been diagnosed within the past eighteen months and this has been a bit of a shock to me regarding the prevalence of cancer among us. I now have to admit that when I was healthy and cancer free I never previously noticed those less fortunate at the time. It is interesting how blind some people can be at times, myself included.

Even with pain and fatigue issues I am still able to get about and contribute to the workings of our household. I still try to do my daily walks and exercises but most days I need a pensioner nap in the afternoon. I have been able to put my recent mental melt down behind me with the help of counselling from the Queensland Cancer Council. That event was a bit scary for me but I have learned a great deal about myself and the human response to moments of despair from the experience.

And that my dear readers is my spicks and specks for the moment.

Everyone should have a Ukulele

Everyone should have a Ukulele

“All of my life…I call yesterday…..The spicks and the specks of my life gone away. Everybody…. spicks and specks…..spicks and specks now…..spicks and specks.”

Lee aka Popeye

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