GREG'S LEGACY

Specialising in the human experience of Living with prostate cancer – warts and all

G’day Neighbour … 01/22/2009

with 2 comments


I heard some interesting stuff about cancer medications …

  • A MAGISTRATE has encouraged a regular marijuana user to attempt to get his drug usage legalised, because it was the only substance that numbed his pain after his whole body was badly burned.

    GREG’S VIEW: It seems ridiculous that the law prohibits the use of a valid medication in such cases simply because the substance can be misiused in recreatrional drug use. One of the mainstays of cancer pain management is morphine based and has become the drug of choice – known as Hillbilly Heroin – of the rich and famous. Yet, there is no suggestion of removing it from the market even though it is being abused.

    tags: wordpress, legalised, marijuana, hillbilly, heroin

    • A MAGISTRATE has encouraged a regular marijuana user to attempt to get his drug usage legalised, because it was the only substance that numbed his pain after his whole body was badly burned.
      • I have been told that the Victorian Government, under Steve Bracks, had chosen not to prosecute those with a medical need of marijuana to grow a plant or two for their personal medical use. I am unable verify if that is the case or not. – post by gnaylor
    • “I used marijuana four times a day and it pretty much relaxes my muscles and relaxes my body so I can breathe easier. It doesn’t take away all the pain but it takes away enough to get me moving and mobile and most of all it helps me sleep.”
      • The use of marijuana for cancer pain is well known. Paliative pain management relies on a base level of slow release opiates (e.g. morphine) which are supplemented with quick acting liquid opiates to fight against ‘pain breakthrough’ of the base level.With opiates, the margin between pain management and losing bodily control is pretty slim. Where a patient wants to maintain contact with his/her carers, marijuana will provide a state of calmness for about four hours and because the drug is being consumed by the pain receptors, there is no sensation of a ‘high’.There should be a movement to have marijuana legalised for medical use. – post by gnaylor
      • In another news story today, a Survey finds a drop in support for cannabis legalisation so it may prove difficult for this man to achieve a positive result

    • The United Kingdom’s Department of Health announced yesterday that all patients being treated for cancer will beome eligible to receive free prescriptions of their drugs through the National Health Service as of April 1 this year. Currently, patients pay a prescription fee of £7.10 for each prescription that needs to be filled.

      Greg’s Comments: In Australia, we are fortunate to have the best Prescription Benefit Scheme (PBS) in the world. My basic pain management costs about $20/week at around $5 per prescription.
      On top of that, there are the anti-constipation, depression, and specialty prescriptions to augment the others – typically 7 tablets at time.
      I reckon I will hit the safety net of $350 around Easter – after that they are free. Now, that’s a pretty good PBS service, isn’t it?

      tags: wordpress

      • Currently, patients pay a prescription fee of £7.10 for each prescription
        • In Australia, patients with a Health Card pay from $5 per prescription. How would you fare with no Health Card and being billed $1100 for a homone implant prescription – post by gnaylor

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    Written by Greg Naylor

    22 January 2009 at 12:31 pm

    Posted in Greg Naylor, MEDICAL, my fight

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    2 Responses

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    1. To quote a musician I like: “Not to change the subject but, what’s wrong with getting high anyway”?

      I personally choose not to consume marijuana, but I know you’re well aware of my opinion that these issues should not concern the state.

      The magistrate’s response, basically saying “if you need it, go out and get it legalised” is an interesting one. He has to enforce the law, but clearly doesn’t want to in this instance.

      Kieran Bennett

      22 January 2009 at 5:54 pm

    2. “I’ve found something that fixes it (my pain) but it’s illegal.

      I know the majority of Australians are not as libertarian as I am, but surely we can all agree on establishing medical necessity as a defence to drug charges.

      Kieran Bennett

      22 January 2009 at 6:10 pm


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